Welcome To The New Henry Tyndale School Website

Further Strategies

Further Strategies

At Henry Tyndale the curriculum that the students follow is tailored to their individual needs. The following strategies are used with the students according to their individual needs

TEACCH

At Henry Tyndale school most classes use the principles of the TEACCH approach to support pupils in the school environment. TEACCH is a structured teaching model which enables pupils with ASD and other additional needs to understand their environments and work independently. The strategies and approaches we use from the TEACCH approach in school support pupils by helping support their areas of difficulty as well as playing to their strengths. Each pupil will be using appropriate TEACCH structure according to their individual needs. The TEACCH approach involves:

  • Structuring the physical environment
  • Using visual supports to make the sequence of daily activities predictable and understandable
  • Using visual supports to make individual tasks understandable
  • Understanding the concept of finished

Physical and visual structure is used because:

  • It makes the work predictable and less confusing
  • Helps the child to understand what is expected of them
  • Helps the child to remain calm
  • Helps the child to learn more effectively. The visual clues help the student to focus on the relevant information
  • Structure helps the child to work independently

Visual structure

The following forms of visual structure are used in the school:

  • Objects of reference
  • Individual Symbols
  • First and then/Now and Next
  • Individual Wall Schedules
  • Mobile schedules
  • Classroom schedules
  • Timers

Physical structure

The physical structure of the classroom needs to be organised so that it promotes independence and as far as it is possible there should be clear areas where different activities occur since this helps children understand what is expected of them.

Work Stations

A workstation incorporates structure, routine, visual cues and limits distraction to develop independence, organisational skills, the concept of working in an ordered manner, the concept of finished and the generalisation of skills. There needs to be clear aims as to why and when the workstation is being used with the pupil. It is important to remember the main aim of a workstation is to promote independent learning

  1. Trays or folders containing activities are placed in drawers on the pupil’s left side. They are arranged from top to bottom. These drawers are numbered, have symbol or colour on them. On the table top is strip with the corresponding numbers, symbols or colour velcroed on to indicate the work to be completed.
  2. The pupil removes the top number/symbol/colour from the strip and matches it to the corresponding tray by means of velcro
  3. Pupil completes activity and places the work in a tray on the right hand side of the table to indicate it is finished
  4. Repeat with the following drawers
  5. Once all numbers/symbol/colour have been removed from strip on table top and activities have been completed, the pupil is finished. There should be a means in place to indicate what their next activity is

TEACCH Tasks

The work designed to be carried out in the independent work area is known as TEACCH tasks. These are self-contained activities which contain all the materials and instructions required for the pupil to do complete them independently. Tasks can be contained in boxes, baskets, in deep or flat trays, in plastic wallets, in folders, in files or on clipboards. Tasks should be designed to individual needs, skills and interests and be motivating. Pupils need to be taught how to carry out tasks before they are presented in the independent work area

Aim of structured tasks:

  • To remove/reduce the need for verbal instruction
  • To provide visual clarification of what is to be done
  • To show when a task is complete
  • To increase independence
  • To increase participation
  • To reduce anxiety
  • To teach target skills
  • To help with the generalisation of skills

The work designed to be carried out in the independent work area is known as TEACCH tasks. These are self – contained activities which contain all the materials and instructions required for the pupil to do complete them independently. Tasks can be contained in boxes, baskets, in deep or flat trays, in plastic wallets, in folders, in files or on clipboards. Tasks should be designed to individual needs, skills and interests and be motivating. Pupils need to be taught how to carry out tasks before they are presented in the independent work area

TEACCH Documents

Attention Autism

‘Attention Autism’ is an approached developed by specialist speech and language therapist, Gina Davies and has been recently introduced to some pupils in school. As well as improving attention it also helps to develop communication through interesting and fun activities are worth talking about! Engaging in activities and learning to turn take can led to improved behaviour.

Attention Autism has four stages that are gradually built upon:

Stage 1: To focus attention.

Use appealing objects to inspire attention and gain focus of child.

Stage 2: To sustain attention

Inspire attention with great activities.

Stage 3: To shift attention

Attend to activity when participating and transfer back to the group once finished turn. 

Address: 5 Agraria Road, Guildford, Surrey, GU2 4LE, United Kingdom

Telephone: +00 44 (0)7704 606907

E-mail: contact@ginadavies.co.uk

Attention Autism Documents

MOVE

MOVE is an activity based programme which uses the combined knowledge of education, therapy and family to teach disabled children the skills of sitting, standing, walking and transferring to the very best of their ability.

MOVE works with the child, the family, teachers, therapists and anyone else who shares their time with them. Using a goal based approach the child works towards agreed targets which range from being able to raise and hold their head independently enabling them to view and interact with the world around them, to being able to play football whilst using a ‘gait trainer (pacer).

At Henry Tyndale we have adopted the MOVE philosophy and encourage our pupils to be as active as they possibly can in their own learning and by exploring their environment. Everyone working together towards each pupil’s mobility goals has really had a massive impact.

Parents reported

“There has been a significant increase in her interest in the world around her”;

“The MOVE programme has been very instrumental in improving her general wellbeing, happiness and ability to do other things”;

“_____ is a much happier child since using the pacer at home and I feel she could do even more”;

“My life and ____’s is much happier now she has the use of her legs after years of being in a wheelchair”

and

“I am over the moon to see _____ walk around on her own in the pacer and to approach you when you come into the room. _____ has made massive progress”.

Staff in school have said

“She can now make a small choice as to where she wants to go when in the gait trainer”;

“______ is not dependent on staff to move him from A – B, he can now make limited choices”

“Parents can see that he is more interested in the world around him and what is going on”;

“Using a bicycle or pacer to move around the school has raised her self esteem as she receives many more interactions than she did when she was in her wheelchair”

Working as part of a multi-disciplinary team underpins the child’s whole learning. Setting up regular meetings when all professionals and parents can work towards shared goals is essential to ensure that the child remains motivated and on target to achieve.

We now have lots of pupils on the MOVE programme and hope to add more this coming academic year. We have purchased additional pacers, standing slings, trikes and other equipment which help facilitate the MOVE programme further.

We now have two MOVE Tutors in the school who will facilitate the addition of other pupils on the programme and lots of staff who have completed the MOVE 2 day practitioner training.

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